PIA18649: The Busy Flank of Arsia Mons
Target Name: Mars
Is a satellite of: Sol (our sun)
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: HiRISE
Product Size: 2880 x 1800 pixels (width x height)
Produced By: University of Arizona/HiRise-LPL
Other Information: Other products from image ESP_031944_1790
Full-Res TIFF: PIA18649.tif (5.191 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA18649.jpg (682.4 kB)

Click on the image above to download a moderately sized image in JPEG format (possibly reduced in size from original)

Original Caption Released with Image:

Click here for larger version of PIA18649
Map Projected Browse Image
Click on the image for larger version

This observation shows an incredible diversity of ancient lava tubes and impact craters filled with sediment on the flank of Arsia Mons.

The rationale for this observation is to get a better look at those lava tubes; their shapes, morphology, and erosional degradation, which ultimately might help to date active period when lava flowed through the volcano. We will also be able to see in high resolution an erosional "snapshot" of the collapsed lava tubes and how they have been modified by dust falling from the air, mass-wasting, and impacts over time.

HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Image Addition Date:
2014-05-22