PIA17702: Hydrated Sulfate Landslides in Ophir Chasma
Target Name: Mars
Is a satellite of: Sol (our sun)
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: HiRISE
Product Size: 2880 x 1800 pixels (width x height)
Produced By: University of Arizona/HiRise-LPL
Other Information: Other products from image PSP_007535_1755
Full-Res TIFF: PIA17702.tif (15.56 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA17702.jpg (801 kB)

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Original Caption Released with Image:

Giant landslides in Ophir Chasma host a variety of geologic surfaces and mineralogies. Some possess a variety of hydrated sulfate minerals that formed in the presence of partially acidic liquid water.

This image of an ancient, approximately 3 billion year-old landslide shows two distinct surface albedos, which are proportions of reflected light. These different toned surfaces also mark a transition from one sulfate mineralogy to another and variations in surface evolution.

The upper slopes to the north are light-toned due to an abundance of hydrated sulfate minerals and bright surface dust. The surfaces that make up the southern portions of the landslide are darker in tone due to the greater frequency of dark sediment that form strings of sand drifts. Additionally, the underlying units of bedrock consist of darker minerals with less hydration then those to the north, implying a change in the ancient aqueous environments that formed them.

HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates the orbiter's HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Image Addition Date:
2013-11-20