PIA13902: NASA Radar Captures Earth Deformation from 2010 Baja Calif. Quake
Target Name: Earth
Is a satellite of: Sol (our sun)
Mission: UAVSAR
Spacecraft: Gulfstream-III
Instrument: L-Band UAVSAR
Product Size: 20528 x 6304 pixels (width x height)
Produced By: JPL
Other Information: Download the KMZ file
Full-Res TIFF: PIA13902.tif (388.2 MB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA13902.jpg (20.55 MB)

Click on the image above to download a moderately sized image in JPEG format (possibly reduced in size from original)

Original Caption Released with Image:

Click here for larger version of figure 1 for PIA13902
Converted Google Earth Image
Click on the image for the larger version

This image is among the first-ever airborne radar images of the deformation in Earth's surface caused by a major earthquake -- the magnitude 7.2 temblor that rocked Mexico's state of Baja California and parts of the American Southwest on April 4, 2010.

The data reveal that in the area studied, the quake moved the Calexico, Calif., region in a downward and southerly direction up to 80 centimeters (31 inches).

A science team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., used the JPL-developed Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to measure surface deformation from the quake. The radar flies at an altitude of 12.5 kilometers (41,000 feet) on a Gulfstream-III aircraft from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif.

The team used a technique that detects minute changes in the distance between the aircraft and the ground over repeated, GPS-guided flights. The team combined data from flights on Oct. 21, 2009, and April 13, 2010. The resulting maps are called interferograms.

This image shows a UAVSAR interferogram swath measuring 110 by 20 kilometers (69 by 12.5 miles). Each colored contour, or fringe, of the interferogram represents 5 centimeters (2 inches) of surface displacement. The full resolution image has a pixel size of about 7 meters (23 feet) on the ground. A version of the image converted to the kmz format that can be displayed in Google Earth is available here.

The quake's maximum ground displacements of up to 3 meters (10 feet) actually occurred well south of where the UAVSAR measurements stop at the Mexican border. However, these displacements were measured using synthetic aperture radar interferometry from European and Japanese satellites and other satellite imagery, and by mapping teams on the ground.

Scientists are still working to determine the exact northwest extent of the main fault rupture, but it is clear it came within 10 kilometers (6 miles) of the UAVSAR swath, close to the point where the interferogram fringes converge. Continued measurements of the region should tell scientists whether the main fault rupture has moved north over time.

The full resolution inteferogram reveals many small "cuts," or discontinuities, in the fringes. These are caused by ground motions ranging from a centimeter to tens of centimeters (a few inches) on small faults. Geologists are finding the exquisite details of the many small fault ruptures extremely interesting and valuable for understanding the faults that ruptured in the April 4th quake.

UAVSAR has mapped California's San Andreas and other faults along the plate boundary from north of San Francisco to the Mexican border every six months since spring 2009, looking for ground motion and increased strain along faults. The goal of the ongoing study is to understand the relative hazard of the San Andreas and faults to its west like the Elsinore and San Jacinto faults, and capture ground displacements from larger quakes.

Each UAVSAR flight serves as a baseline for subsequent quake activity. The team estimates displacement for each region, with the goal of determining how strain is partitioned between faults. When quakes do occur during the project, the team will observe their associated ground motions and assess how they may redistribute strain to other nearby faults, potentially priming them to break. Data from the Baja quake are being integrated into JPL's QuakeSim advanced computer models to better understand the fault systems that ruptured and potential impacts to nearby faults, such as the San Andreas, Elsinore and San Jacinto faults.

UAVSAR is part of NASA's ongoing effort to apply space-based technologies, ground-based techniques and complex computer models to advance our understanding of quakes and quake processes. The data are giving scientists a baseline set of imagery in the event of future quakes. These images can then be combined with post-quake imagery to measure ground deformation, determine how slip on faults is distributed, and learn more about fault zone properties.

For more information on UAVSAR, visit: http://uavsar.jpl.nasa.gov/. For more on JPL's studies of the Baja earthquake, see: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-208; http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-258; and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-421.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL/Google

Image Addition Date:
2011-03-04