PIA02469: Inside Eros' Giant Gouge
Target Name: Eros
Is a satellite of: Sol (our sun)
Mission: NEAR Shoemaker
Spacecraft: NEAR Shoemaker
Instrument: Multi-Spectral Imager
Product Size: 512 x 345 pixels (width x height)
Produced By: Johns Hopkins University/APL
Addition Date: 2000-05-07
Primary Data Set: NEAR Home Page
Full-Res TIFF: PIA02469.tif (72.7 kB)
Full-Res JPEG: PIA02469.jpg (15.07 kB)

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Original Caption Released with Image:

This picture was taken from NEAR on February 15, 2000, while the spacecraft was passing directly over the large gouge that creates Eros's characteristic peanut shape. It is a mosaic of individual images showing features as small as 120 feet (35 meters) across. Although most of the asteroid is in shadow, we are able to see inside the gouge. Many narrow parallel troughs closely follow the shape of the gouge. Although they appear curvilinear from this view, they are most likely oriented parallel to the length of the asteroid. The strong lighting contrast along the terminator (the line separating day from night on Eros) makes it easy to see that most of the surface is saturated with impact craters. Inside the gouge, however, only smaller craters are present, indicating that the area within the gouge is younger than the surface along the terminator. This implies that the event that caused the gouge must have happened more recently than the formation of the rest of the surface of Eros.

Built and managed by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, NEAR was the first spacecraft launched in NASA's Discovery Program of low-cost, small-scale planetary missions. See the NEAR web page at http://near.jhuapl.edu/ for more details.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL/JHUAPL

Image Addition Date:
2000-05-07